636331396462182436-jeffs

Sioux Falls

 

Lyle Jeffs’ public defender Kathryn Nester said a three-story fall onto concrete her client suffered in the mid-1990s and a car accident he had in 1998 may have left Jeffs with memory problems and wants him to receive a neurological exam and an MRI.
Nester said she does not think a professional will deem Jeffs incompetent to stand trial, but she wants to be able to explain to a jury why her client can’t remember key moments that relate to the crimes alleged by prosecutors. The first accident happened in 1997 when Jeffs fell three stories at a construction site, hit his head on concrete and rocks and was left unconscious, Nester said in a court filing. Doctors said he suffered traumatic brain injuries and could experience a personality change, the documents said.

A year later, Jeffs was in a car accident in the Salt Lake City area that left him unconscious with cuts on his forehead and required treatment for traumatic brain injuries, Nester said court documents.

Nester told the judge she is trying to obtain complete medical records about both accidents but said it’s difficult since they happened some long ago. Some records may have been destroyed, she said, justifying her request for a new neurological exam for Jeffs.

 

[July 17 Lyle’s trial to begin Sept. 18 ]

Lyle Jeffs entered a not guilty plea in federal court Salt Lake City July 10 on charges related to food stamp fraud and failure to appear in court.
Judge Wells scheduled a two-week trial to begin Sept. 18 for the matter to be heard in federal court. Wells ordered Jeffs jailed pending trial. Jeffs could face up to 10 years in prison on a failure-to-appear charge filed after his arrest.
The two other felony counts of benefits fraud and money laundering carry possible 5- and 10-year sentences.

Only one member of the FLDS, one of Jeffs’ nieces attended.   Last year, 20 to 30 people, including Jeffs’ sons and at least one of his plural wives, would attend his hearings.

Eleven co-defendants resolved their cases by pleading guilty to felony or misdemeanor charges. All avoided jail time or paying restitution.

 

[June 23 Lyle found in Yankton S.D. ]

A federal grand jury has issued a new indictment against Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints polygamous sect leader Lyle Steed Jeffs.   Jeffs has been charged with a new felony count for failure to appear. Prosecutors filed the charge in federal court in Salt Lake City on June 21.

 

 

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pawned Leatherman tools

Bishop Lyle Jeffs, leader of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, was living out of his car for two weeks before his arrest in Yankton, South Dakota, an FBI official said June 15.   

A polygamous sect leader’s life on the run came to end June 14 after he hocked a couple pairs of pliers at a pawn shop in a small South Dakota town the day before.

Lyle Steed Jeffs sold the Leatherman multitools for $37 at River City Treasures and Pawn in Yankton, South Dakota, on June 13 using his last name as his first name, said owner Kevin Haug. Jeffs, he said, handed over his actual ID and filled out the form to complete the deal.

“That was Lyle’s master plan to avoid capture was telling that my first name’s my last name, I guess,” Haug said.

Haug wasn’t in the store at the time but said his employee thought Jeffs was “acting strangely” and Googled his name after he left. Jeffs came up wanted.

 

[December 22 2018 guilty plea by John Waxman]

f201605816

John Waxman

 

Speaking softly, John Wayman agreed to plead guilty to a single count of food stamp fraud.

“Has anyone offered you any inducements or threatened to get you to plead guilty?” Judge Stewart asked.

“No,” Wayman replied.

“Is it your intention to plead guilty of your own free will?”

“Yes.”
Wayman admitted that between 2011 and 2016, he knowingly facilitated Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits to non-beneficiaries. Federal prosecutors have charged 11 FLDS members with food stamp fraud and money laundering charges, accusing them of ordering followers of the Utah-based polygamous church to hand over SNAP benefits to leaders, to do with as they wish. The feds allege the scheme exceeds $12 million in taxpayer dollars.

But under the deal, Wayman gets released from jail immediately and has to pay no restitution. He also doesn’t have any probation and a $100 fine. The feds have also agreed not to indict him for any other crimes that they may be aware of. Federal prosecutors defended their plea bargain offer, saying they believe it sends a message to the “culture of fraud” within the FLDS community, resolves the religious freedom issues and obtains guilty pleas. They also appeared to acknowledge some difficulty in obtaining a plea deal.

“It’s a very unique case that has unique legal issues,” assistant U.S. Attorney Rob Lund told the judge.
Plea deals have been offered to other defendants in the case, with one already notifying the government he will accept it.

[December 12]

flds-kimball-dee-barlow

Kimball Dee Barlow

Kimball Dee Barlow will enter a guilty plea of a charge of conspiracy to commit fraud as a misdemeanor, Attorney Rudy Bautista says. The terms from there are, in addition to pleading to that, there would be no incarceration.
Lyle Jeffs is accused of escaping home confinement in june. The FBI has said he used olive oil to slip out of a GPS monitoring device. A $50,000 reward has been offered for information leading to his arrest
Lyle Jeffs is the brother of imprisoned polygamist leader Warren Jeffs, who is serving a life sentence in a Texas prison for child sex assault related to underage “marriages.”

 

August 30 Lyle Jeffs,SHOULD BE CONSIDERED ARMED AND DANGEROUS ]

lylejeffs_zpsqaz8gx9u

Lyle Jeffs [FBI]

On August 29,, the FBI announced the agency is offering a reward of up to $50,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of Lyle Jeffs, 56, who might try to change his appearance, is considered armed and dangerous and should not be approached.

Date(s) of Birth Used January 17, 1960, January 19, 1960
Place of Birth Utah
Hair Brown
Eyes Brown
Height 6’1″
Weight 210 pounds
Sex Male
Race White
Nationality American
NCIC W136539035
Reward:

The FBI is offering a reward of up to $50,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of Lyle Steed Jeff

SHOULD BE CONSIDERED ARMED AND DANGEROUS

Submit a Tip:

If you have any information concerning this person, please contact your local FBI office or the nearest American Embassy or Consulate.

Field Office: Salt Lake City
https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/wcc/lyle-steed-jeffs

 

 

 

[August 9 Short Creek FLDS reorganized ]

nephijeffswarrenjeffsattendscourthearingoqxu5v4jn8fl

Nephi Jeffs

 

 

Warren Jeffs has named a new bishop of Short Creek, replacing one brother, Lyle, with another, Nephi.

Warren Jeffs noted in his lengthy instructions to Nephi that each of Short Creek’s recent bishops had failed: “Each one has had the great sin of finding comfort in women’s attention,”

[March 8 FLDS towns will pay $1.6 million in civil rights trial

Colorado City camera

Colorado City camera

In a civil rights trial, the jury reached a verdict on its fourth day of deliberations, and awarded $2.2 million to six residents eligible for damages. But the towns will only have to pay $1.6 million because lawyers negotiated a settlement over that part of the case.

The judge will now decide what other punishments to impose. Federal authorities could ask for the Colorado City Marshal’s Office to be disbanded and for its duties to be handed over to local sheriffs. Federal attorneys describe the local police force and FLDS Church’s security operation as paranoid entities that worked to violate the rights of nonbelievers. Witnesses for the government said church security spied on people with cameras placed around the towns and positioned themselves to keep an eye on who was arriving.

The former head of church security described elaborate cloak-and-dagger efforts taken to avoid scrutiny from outside law enforcement, such as using “burner” cellphones, encrypted radios and driving 40 miles to make phone calls out of fear that a local cell tower was being monitored by investigators.

[March 1 FLDS : only one defendant, Kimball Dee Barlow, 51 at large  ]

Church leaders arrested

Church leaders arrested

On February 26, a judge in Salt Lake City ordered defendant John Clifton Wayman, 56, detained, finding that he presented a risk to flee. Seth Steed Jeffs, 42, of Custer, S.D., appeared February 29 in a federal court in South Dakota, where a judge ordered him to remain in custody , too, and to be transferred to Utah by federal marshals. As of February 29, only one defendant, Kimball Dee Barlow, 51, had not been apprehended or surrendered.

February 26 SNAP fraud indictments in Colorado City, Ariz.
Prosecutors believe leaders of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints diverted funds from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, and ordered church members to use the benefits to place goods in a communal storehouse to later be distributed among church members.
A two-count indictment charges 11 leaders and members of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (FLDS Church) with conspiracy to commit Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering. The defendants include leaders of the church.Charged in the indictment are Lyle Steed Jeffs, age 56, John Clifton Wayman, age 56, Kimball Dee Barlow, age 51, Winford Johnson Barlow, age 50, Rulon Mormon Barlow, age 45, Ruth Peine Barlow, age 41, and Preston Yates Barlow, age 41, all of Hildale; Seth Steed Jeffs, age 42, of Custer, South Dakota; and Nephi Steed Allred, Hyrum Bygnal Dutson, age 55, and Kristal Meldrum Dutson, age 55, all of Colorado City.
The indictment alleges that in March 2015, using SNAP fraud proceeds, Kimball Barlow signed a check for $16,978 to Orchid’s Paper Products Company for the purchase of paper products. During the period May 31, 2013, through September 22, 2014, the indictment alleges Ruth Barlow signed five checks totaling $13,561 made payable to John Deere Financial. The SNAP fraud proceeds were used for installment payments on a 2013 John Deere load tractor. SNAP fraud proceeds were also used for 16 checks totaling $30,236 payable to Ford Motor Credit for installment payments on a 2012 Ford F-350 purchased by Winford Barlow about Sept. 29, 2012.
The violations included in the indictment are especially egregious since they allege that leaders of the conspiracy directed others to commit crimes, for which only certain people benefited,”

[February 8 federal jury trial against Colorado City, Ariz. and Hildale, Utah ]

Joseph F. Smith family

This turn of the century family portrait was taken close to the time Joseph F. Smith succeeded Lorenzo Snow as president of the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints in October 1901. Besides Levira, with whom he had no children, Joseph had five other wives and forty-eight children. His wives are (L to R seated by Joseph): Mary Taylor Schwartz (married, 1884, seven children); Edna Lambson (married 1871, ten children); Julina Lambson (married 1866, thirteen children, including Joseph Fielding Smith—top row, center); Sarah Ellen Richards (married 1868, eleven children); Alice Ann Kimball (married 1883, seven children); circa 1904

 

 

PHOENIX (CN) – The former chief marshal of two towns run by a fundamentalist Mormon sect testified February 3 that he looked the other way when men in Colorado City, Ariz. and Hildale, Utah took underage girls as their “spiritual wives.”
The Department of Justice sued the twin towns in 2012, claiming they denied non-church members police protection, water and housing. The towns are dominated by members of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, whose leader, Warren Jeffs, is serving life in prison for sexually assaulting 12- and 15-year-old girls, whom he called his spiritual wives.
A federal jury trial against the two towns began in January and is expected to last through the end of February.
The government accuses the Colorado City Marshal’s Office of selectively enforcing “laws and regulations against non-FLDS individuals on the basis of religion.”

[September 16 2015 Floods catch 16 near FLDS center ]

Hildale • Washes divide Hildale, Utah, and adjoining Colorado City, Ariz. A big one, called Short Creek Wash, is supposed to act like a big drainage ditch and runs at almost a 45-degree angle through the community.

Smaller washes connect to Short Creek Wash. At about 5 p.m. Monday, 16 people — women and children — were caught when water rushed from one of those smaller washes into Short Creek Wash.

[March 24 2013 FLDS home covered in surveillance cameras]
read

Colorado City camera

Colorado City camera

The twin towns of Hildale, Utah, and Colorado City, Ariz., known collectively as “Short Creek” and home to the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is covered in surveillance cameras.
“Our idea was to stop the underage marriages, and I think we’ve done that,” said Gary Engels, a Mohave County investigator who spearheaded the crackdown. “But, if anything, the community has become a lot more closed to society. The people have become a lot more paranoid. map

[March 17]

Willie Jessop, ex-FLDS activist

Willie Jessop, ex-FLDS activist

Willie Jessop, former member of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, walks down the hallway following a hearing Tuesday, March 5, 2013, in Salt Lake City. A 3rd District Judge has given initial approval for the eventual creation of a board of trustees to take over homes and property belonging to a polygamous sect led by Warren Jeffs on the Utah-Arizona border. Judge Denise Lindberg approved the plan during a hearing Tuesday morning in Salt Lake City. Her approval is not a final decision, but rather permission to explore this option. Any action is pending the Utah legislature paying $5.7 million it owes in professional fees to a trust created in 2005 to handle the properties Willie Jessop, said he’s confident a board can be created that does what’s best for everybody.
“There is enough compassionate people in the community that understand the importance of protecting their neighbors’ interests, even if their neighbor is required to answer them nothing,” Jessop said.

[February 14]

Second Ward fundamentalist Mormons

Second Ward fundamentalist Mormons

Members of the fundamentalist Mormon group in Centennial Park are behind the new grocery store off of AZ Highway 389 and say they will allow anyone to shop there.

The Centennial Park group broke away from the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in the mid-1980s and has prospered with a pro-business and welcoming mind-set.

The FLDS-controlled CMC Food Town, the only grocery store in Colorado City and its twin city of Hildale, Utah, abruptly closed in November. The towns’ lone hardware store and RadioShack also closed.

FLDS Church leader Warren Jeffs, 57, is imprisoned in Texas on convictions of sexually assaulting two underage girls.

Even while behind bars, Jeffs is said to still release edicts to his followers, including recent strict food restrictions and many believe he is behind the closing of the stores.

Controlling food is just one more way for Jeffs to control his people and punish outsiders as only FLDS faithful are allowed to get food from what’s called the Bishop’s Storehouse.

“You can only survive off the storehouse,” Knudson said. “There are absolute two societies now. If you are not in with them they don’t even talk with you.”

Humanitarian groups have been concerned over the closing of the grocery store and welcome the news of the new store in Centennial Park.

“This is great news,” said Paul Murphy, spokesperson for the Utah Attorney General’s Office. “People have literally been bringing truckloads of food into this area making sure families are fed.” On 13 May 1984 the portion of Johnson’s followers who were dismissed or left on their own, held their first Priesthood Meeting just outside of town. They named their group the “Second Ward” in contrast to those following Johnson, whom the Centennial Park group refers to as the “First Ward.” Initially they met in the home of Alma Timpson.
By 27 September 1986, the Centennial Park group had built a meeting house and later, in 2003, a charter school was built for the town’s growing elementary-age population.
Most of this group lives in Centennial Park City, Arizona (36°57′21.96″N 112°58′59.64″W), a town approximately 3 miles (5 km) south of the twin communities of Colorado City, Arizona and Hildale, Utah,[1] with a small number living in the Salt Lake Valley.

[February 6]

Ruby Jessops, children and sister

Ruby Jessops, children and sister

[January 22]
PHOENIX (AP) _ Arizona Attorney General Tom Horne says there is an ongoing criminal investigation into a polygamous sect along the Utah-Arizona border.
The Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints’ leader, Warren Jeffs, is jailed in Texas for life after being convicted of sexually assaulting two of his underage brides.
A 26-year-old woman who claims Jeffs forced her into marriage at age 14 has now fled the group. She says she and her six children were held against their will for years.
Horne says her allegations of forced underage sex, among other things, are part of the ongoing case, but he declined to provide details.
Jeffs was convicted in Texas after similar allegations were leveled against him and others following a 2008 raid on an FLDS ranch in Texas.
Ruby Jessop escape from Colorado City, Ariz. along with her six children ages 2 to 10.
“ She went to court in Kingman and got a court order to bring her children out. I talked to her for a bit his morning. The kids were huddled around a TV, which they have seldom if ever seen before. “

[October 11,’11]

Some wives of Warren Jeffs

Some wives of Warren Jeffs

The woman had been living with her parents, and ran to the home of Willie Jessop, former spokesman for the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, who currently supports a rival seeking to replace Jeffs as prophet..
Washington County sheriff’s deputies helped one of the wives of polygamous sect leader Warren Jeffs leave the sect’s home base community along the Utah-Arizona border Monday.
The sheriff’s deputies helped diffuse what had become a standoff with FLDS men outside Jessop’s office, after a manhunt was launched, the woman was taken to a shelter. Deputies arrived on a ‘keep the peace’ call at about 3pm.
She asked for assistance in leaving the community,.
They are looking into allegations she was held against her own will and even drugged.

Wills was elected to the City Council in 2010. He's a former aide to ex-state Senator Shirley Huntley, who was convicted on corruption charges in 2012 for funneling taxpayer money to a shady non-profit organization staffed by her relatives. Huntley is currently serving a year in prison for stealing $88,000 from the non-profit

Wills was elected to the City Council in 2010. He’s a former aide to ex-state Senator Shirley Huntley, who was convicted on corruption charges in 2012 for funneling taxpayer money to a shady non-profit organization staffed by her relatives. Huntley is currently serving a year in prison for stealing $88,000 from the non-profit

Ruben Wills was indicted with five felony counts of failing to disclose his financial dealings on five separate disclosure reports between 2012 and 2014.
Wills’ lawyer, Steve Zissou said his client will be vindicated eventually, and will “continue to work tirelessly to help the people in his community live better and fuller lives.”
The councilman was released without bail on February 3. His last arrest was in May regarding tens of thousands of dollars that allegedly disappeared into a not-for-profit group he once headed, New York4Life.

John and Frances

John and Frances


Former Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.) will stand trial on campaign finance-related charges; jury selection to begin April 12 and opening arguments for April 23.

Edwards is facing six felony charges stemming from nearly $1 million in payments two of his political backers made to cover expenses incurred by his mistress, Rielle Hunter, and her child that Edwards fathered. Some of the money was paid as Edwards was running for president in 2007 and 2008. Some of it was paid after he quit the race.

The government contends that the payments were campaign donations intended to advance his political career.
 

John Edwards Indictment

John Edwards Indictment

 

Grand Jury Allegations

Grand Jury Allegations


[December 22, 2011]A federal judge says she has two letters from a cardiologist saying ex-presidential candidate John Edwards has a life-threatening condition that will require surgery in February.
The letters were revealed during a hearing Friday to consider whether the 58-year-old ex-North Carolina Senator would go on trial later this month for alleged campaign finance violations.
Attorneys for Edwards were seeking a 60-day delay to allow time for Edwards to recover. The judge delayed the trial to March 26.
Edwards was in court at the judge’s request, although doctors advised him to avoid travel and all court proceedings.
Prosecutors say they’re ready to try Edwards on six felony and misdemeanor counts related to nearly $1 million from wealthy donors used to help hide his pregnant mistress during his 2008 While House run. The latest from the National Enquirer: “John Edwards Secret Wedding to Rielle! His desperate attempt to CHEAT JUSTICE.” The mainstream media normally would turn a blind eye to such headlines. But this case – made for the tabloids with its infidelity, Hollywood-handsome characters, large financial gifts and jet-setting lifestyles – has been stranger than fiction. The tabloids, with reports that seemed farfetched and bogus, often had the story right and first.

[December 22]John Edwards says he has been diagnosed with a medical condition that would make it difficult for him to attend his approaching criminal trial over campaign finances and is asking for it to be delayed.

In a motion filed Thursday, Edwards’ lawyers asked a federal judge to delay the start of the Jan. 30 trial for at least two months. They did not disclose his illness and filed sealed records with the court. Prosecutors said they are ready to try Edwards on six felony and misdemeanor counts related to nearly $1 million from wealthy donors used to help hide his pregnant mistress during his 2008 run for the While House.
Has disgraced ex-senator, Edwards’ whose illicit affair with Rielle Hunter, 47, and her pregnancy was uncovered during the 2008 presidential campaign , asked the blonde divorcee to move into his North Carolina home? Is she “considering the move?”
[June 3]John Edwards, the former Democratic senator from North Carolina, pleaded not guilty Friday to charges that he conspired to cover up an extramarital affair while running for president in 2008 by “secretly obtaining,” misusing and misreporting certain campaign contributions in violation of federal law.
He entered his plea at the federal courthouse in Winston-Salem on the afternoon of June 3, setting the stage for a trial to begin July 11. When the judge read him his list of rights, including the right to remain silent, Mr. Edwards, who was the Democratic vice presidential nominee in 2004 and twice a candidate for president, said: “Your honor, I’m an attorney. I’m aware of that.”

GENERAL ALLEGATIONS
Relevant Persons and Entities
1. From in or about 1999 until in or about 2005,
JOHNNY REID EDWARDS was a United States
Senator from the State of North Earolina. From in or about 2007
until in or about 2008, EDWARDS was a candidate for the office of
President of the United States. A centerpiece of
candidacy was his public image as a devoted family man. The
communication strategy developed by campaign stressed
the importance of publicizing, among other things, “that
family comes first.”
2. Person A,`a long-time assistant to EDWARDS, worked
for EDWARDS on his presidential campaign. Person A’s duties as a
campaign employee included, among other things, handling personal
tasks on behalf of EDWARDS.
3. From in or about February 2006 through at least in
or about August 2008, EDWARDS had an extramarital affair with
Person B, which resulted in a pregnancy and the birth of a child.
4. Person was a political supporter of EDWARDS
beginning in or about 2004.
5. Person was involved in raising campaign funds
for EDWARDS, and served as his campaign’s Finance Chair during
the 2008 presidential campaign cycle.
6. In or about January 2007, EDWARDS formed the “John
Edwards for President” Committee to receive contributions to
EDWARDS in support of his candidacy for President of the United
States.
Federal Campaign Contribution Limit
and Disclosure Requirements
7. The Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as
amended, Title 2, United States Code, Sections 431 through 455
(the “Election Act”), was a federal statute that regulated the
influence of money on politics in order to prevent corruption and
the appearance of corruption in federal elections.
8. In order to restrict the influence that any one
person could have on the outcome of the 2008 primary election for
President of the United States, the Election Act established that
the most an individual could contribute to any candidate for that
primary election was $2,300. The Election Act also prohibited
presidential candidates from accepting contributions from
individuals in excess of this limit. EDWARDS and the John
Edwards for President Committee were subject to the Election Act
and its contribution limit.
9. The Election Act’s contribution limit applied to
anything of value provided for the purpose of influencing the
presidential election, including contributions to a candidate
and his/her campaign; expenditures made in cooperation,
consultation, or concert, with, or at the request or suggestion
of, a candidate or his/her campaign; and payments for
personal expenses of a candidate unless they would have been made
irrespective of the candidacy.
10. The Federal Election Commission was an
agency of the Executive Branch of the United States Government
responsible for the administration and civil enforcement of
federal election and campaign finance laws.
11. The Election Act required each presidential
campaign committee to file periodic campaign finance reports with
the FEC. In these reports, the committees were required to
identify each person who, during the relevant reporting period,
contributed more than $200 to the committee, together with the
date and the amount of any such contribution. The committees
were also required to disclose expenditures by the campaign.
EDWARDS, through the John Edwards for President Committee, was
required tc and did, in fact, file these periodic reports with
the`FEC.
12. The periodic reports that campaign committees
filed with the FEC were made available to the public. These
reports were intended to provide citizens with a transparent
record of the amounts and sources of campaign contributions, and
were intended to assist voters in making informed decisions at
the polls.

Jeff Warren Indictment

Jeff Warren Indictment


The prosecution has rested its case in the sexual assault trial of polygamist sect leader Warren Jeffs.

SAN ANGELO, Texas — The state planned to conclude its case against Warren Jeffs on August 3, with much audio evidence having been heard by the jury August 2. Jeffs had the opportunity to begin his defense August 3.

The court heard a recording of Jeffs speaking to a group of young women or girls. He stood in court for more than an hour, objecting for several minutes off and on while the jury had on headphones and speakers blared to the rest of the courtroom for about an hour and a half.

“You have to know how to be sexually excited,” Jeffs said in the recording. “Everyone assists. Help one another.”

The prosecution claimed based on other documents that the 55-year-old leader of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints was with the group of 12 women during the recording, including the girl whom is he is charged of sexually assaulting when she was 15 and he was 49.

Jeffs spoke of shaving to get ready in the recording, and he said they were meant to be a “heavenly comfort” to him when he was “down and out.”

“You were dressed when you heard the word of God, now you’re undressed and I hope you felt the peace,” Jeffs’ voice said near the end of the recording.

The tape finished at about 6:15 p.m., and 51st District Judge Barbara Walther said court would continue at 8 p.m. to hear the state’s remaining evidence and finish out the seventh day of Jeffs’ trial.

He is accused of also sexually assaulting a girl when she was 12.

The state said it has at least one more tape to be played before finishing with evidence.

Jeffs continually disrupted court proceedings August 2 with objections he raised over another audio recording of himself. Walther said she was considering removing Jeffs from the courtroom while the audio evidence is played to the jury in his child sexual assault trial, but he stayed through the proceedings.

Walther warned Jeffs that if he continues to give “speeches” and interrupt court proceedings he may jeopardize his right to self-representation.

“This is not a matter where you can manipulate these proceedings,” Walther said.

Jeffs interrupted the court and the first audio recording several times. Each time Walther removed the jury.

Jurors listened to Jeffs in an audio recording taken in a car. The garbled sound was barely distinguishable.

“Through prayer and obedience … we learn how to become Zion,” Jeffs said in the recording, using the same distant voice that he had used to object to the admission of religiously related evidence all morning.

Walther also told Jeffs that repeated interruptions could lead to his removal from the courtroom.

A ruling by another judge denied a motion Jeffs filed to remove Walther — his third attempt to have her recused — and the judge issued sanctions so that Jeffs would incur the state’s cost in fighting Jeffs’ motion.

Jeffs also protested the state reading church documents taken in the 2008 raid on the FLDS Yearning for Zion Ranch.

Under questioning from special prosecutor Eric Nichols, Texas Ranger Nick Hanna said that terms such as “heavenly comfort wife” and “drawing close” as stated in the documents suggest physical affection.

Jeffs has objected to the interpretation.

His continued objections led to Nichols throwing down a file on the prosecutors’ table.

The documents have given descriptions of lessons that Jeffs gave to his “spiritual” or “celestial” wives. The Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints practices polygamy.

“I called in (two FLDS women) and had them touch me,” states a document the prosecution said was written by Jeffs. “They felt a heavenly fire as a witness, and the Lord showed me that they were prepared to go forward and witness greater heavenly things.”

Records shown August 2 state that Jeffs unofficially “married” a 14-year-old girl when he was 48. Prosecutors allege Jeffs sexually assaulted the girl when she was 15. Based on evidence, the girl’s baby was allegedly fathered by Jeffs.

An expert in family law called by the prosecution testified August 2 that Jeffs was never legally married to the 12-year-old and 15-year-old girls he is accused of sexually assaulting. After Jack Sampson, a law professor at University of Texas School of Law, gave that as his opinion, Jeffs objected to the use of a legal definition of marriage in preference to the definition of marriage held by the FLDS.

“We are delving into something as though man’s law was more important than God’s law,” Jeffs said.

Going into the seventh day of the trial, in which Jeffs faces two counts of sexual assault of a child, the prosecution continued calling witnesses and building its case against the head of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. After Sampson testified about the legal definition of marriage, Hanna was called to the stand for a second time to testify about records seized in the April 2008 raid of the FLDS ranch near Eldorado.

Jeffs on August 1 made his third failed try to remove Walther, using a written motion of recusal styled as a message from God to Walther, delivered by Jeffs through a revelation he claimed to have experienced July 31. He continued to object to various exhibits brought forward by Nichols, arguing that his right to practice his religion freely is being trampled by the trial.

Nichols told the jury that Jeffs as an individual is on trial, not his religion.